Summer reading suggestions for the college bound

 Final grades have been posted, graduation has passed, and seniors are now home for the summer as they anxiously anticipate leaving for college in the fall. While they may not have any academic requirements for the next few months, college bound students can take advantage of their time off by reading quality literature. Not only will reading keep their critical thinking and reading comprehension skills sharp, but it will also provide them with an additional knowledge base when they arrive on campus in the fall. The following summer reading suggestions for college bound students will help the time before college starts pass quickly – and give them plenty to talk about with their new classmates this fall.      -              How To Win Friends and Influence People    – Dale Carnegie     The consummate self-help book,  How to Win Friends and Influence People  is perfect for incoming college students nervous about meeting new people, making new friends, or being at school with 10,000 – or more – complete strangers. The advice in the book, including how to make people feel appreciated and how to sway others to your point of view, is applicable both when making friends in the dorms as well as later in life.      -              Between the World and Me    – Ta-Nehisi Coates     Written as a letter from Coates to his teenage son, this National Book Award winner discusses feelings and realities of being black in America. Toni Morrison called the novel “required reading,” saying “The language of ‘Between the World and Me,’ like Coates's journey, is visceral, eloquent, and beautifully redemptive. And its examination of the hazards and hopes of black male life is as profound as it is revelatory.”      -              An Illustrated Book of Bad Arguments    - Ali Almossawi and Alejandro Giraldo     Learning how to argue for and defend a position is one of the hallmarks of the liberal arts education.  An Illustrated Book of Bad Arguments  may look like a children’s picture book, but it can help college bound students avoid logical pitfalls – as well as recognize bad arguments when others make them.      -                Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear    – Elizabeth Gilbert      Big Magic  is a celebration of the creative process. Students looking to go into fine arts, communication, and more will draw inspiration from Gilbert’s follow-up novel to her international bestseller  Eat, Pray, Love.       And if you want to listen instead…      -              Hamilton     (Original Broadway Cast Recording)  – Lin-Manuel Miranda     This masterpiece fusion of hip hop and history shows how a single generation can change the world – and how our personal choices can have long-reaching effects in our lives. "Alexander Hamilton was himself part of a generation that changed the world," wrote Dean Bob Jacobsen of University of California, Berkeley. "His contributions still echo today in government, business, and even in how news is reported."

Final grades have been posted, graduation has passed, and seniors are now home for the summer as they anxiously anticipate leaving for college in the fall. While they may not have any academic requirements for the next few months, college bound students can take advantage of their time off by reading quality literature. Not only will reading keep their critical thinking and reading comprehension skills sharp, but it will also provide them with an additional knowledge base when they arrive on campus in the fall. The following summer reading suggestions for college bound students will help the time before college starts pass quickly – and give them plenty to talk about with their new classmates this fall.

 

-          How To Win Friends and Influence People – Dale Carnegie

 

The consummate self-help book, How to Win Friends and Influence People is perfect for incoming college students nervous about meeting new people, making new friends, or being at school with 10,000 – or more – complete strangers. The advice in the book, including how to make people feel appreciated and how to sway others to your point of view, is applicable both when making friends in the dorms as well as later in life.

 

-          Between the World and Me – Ta-Nehisi Coates

 

Written as a letter from Coates to his teenage son, this National Book Award winner discusses feelings and realities of being black in America. Toni Morrison called the novel “required reading,” saying “The language of ‘Between the World and Me,’ like Coates's journey, is visceral, eloquent, and beautifully redemptive. And its examination of the hazards and hopes of black male life is as profound as it is revelatory.”

 

-          An Illustrated Book of Bad Arguments - Ali Almossawi and Alejandro Giraldo

 

Learning how to argue for and defend a position is one of the hallmarks of the liberal arts education. An Illustrated Book of Bad Arguments may look like a children’s picture book, but it can help college bound students avoid logical pitfalls – as well as recognize bad arguments when others make them.

 

-          Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear – Elizabeth Gilbert

 

Big Magic is a celebration of the creative process. Students looking to go into fine arts, communication, and more will draw inspiration from Gilbert’s follow-up novel to her international bestseller Eat, Pray, Love.

 

And if you want to listen instead…

 

-          Hamilton (Original Broadway Cast Recording) – Lin-Manuel Miranda

 

This masterpiece fusion of hip hop and history shows how a single generation can change the world – and how our personal choices can have long-reaching effects in our lives. "Alexander Hamilton was himself part of a generation that changed the world," wrote Dean Bob Jacobsen of University of California, Berkeley. "His contributions still echo today in government, business, and even in how news is reported."