Tips on how to guide your teen to land summer jobs and internships

 As school lets out for the year, many teens are looking for ways to improve their resumes and gain valuable work experience through summer jobs and internships. While summer vacation may be just around the corner, it’s still not too late for your teen to find something to do. The following tips can help parents guide their teens as they search for a summer job or internship!   Discuss their interests   While it may not be possible to find your teen’s dream job, it’s possible to find a position that connects with their likes and interests. Ask your teen about their favorite subjects, clubs they enjoy, or extracurriculars they participate in. If they love writing, a local newspaper or magazine could be a great fit. Likewise, a teen who wants to run their own business would learn best from experience with an entrepreneur.   Ask around   Many jobs and internships – both paid and unpaid – are found through word of mouth. Ask around with friends and family to see if they know of anyone looking for summer help. Likewise, if your teen has a specific position in mind, don’t be afraid to ask! Encourage them to call the person or business directly to ask if they have any available positions.   Review their resume   Even if they don’t have much experience, make sure to list everything else they’ve done. This includes clubs, sports teams, church groups, volunteer work, and other extracurricular activities. Highlighting any leadership positions or roles can emphasize certain skills and characteristics. Review their resume before they submit any applications, checking for spelling or grammatical mistakes, formatting issues, or any relevant experience they may have forgotten to list.   Practice for the interview   Prospective employers know teens won’t have lots of work experience; because of this, they tend to rely heavily on the interview process when making hiring decisions. Help your child ace their interview by going over practice questions, helping them choose an interview outfit, or reviewing business etiquette. Ask a friend, neighbor, or colleague to come over for the evening to conduct a mock interview; this will help your teen get comfortable speaking to a strange adult.   Design a custom internship   No luck finding a position? Help your teen design their own internship. Brainstorm ideas for an independent study project, such as conducting market research or identifying business trends. Next, find a teacher or other community member to “sponsor” or advise them on the project. Not only does this show initiative and creativity, but it can also help your teen make connections for potential positions next year.

As school lets out for the year, many teens are looking for ways to improve their resumes and gain valuable work experience through summer jobs and internships. While summer vacation may be just around the corner, it’s still not too late for your teen to find something to do. The following tips can help parents guide their teens as they search for a summer job or internship!

Discuss their interests

While it may not be possible to find your teen’s dream job, it’s possible to find a position that connects with their likes and interests. Ask your teen about their favorite subjects, clubs they enjoy, or extracurriculars they participate in. If they love writing, a local newspaper or magazine could be a great fit. Likewise, a teen who wants to run their own business would learn best from experience with an entrepreneur.

Ask around

Many jobs and internships – both paid and unpaid – are found through word of mouth. Ask around with friends and family to see if they know of anyone looking for summer help. Likewise, if your teen has a specific position in mind, don’t be afraid to ask! Encourage them to call the person or business directly to ask if they have any available positions.

Review their resume

Even if they don’t have much experience, make sure to list everything else they’ve done. This includes clubs, sports teams, church groups, volunteer work, and other extracurricular activities. Highlighting any leadership positions or roles can emphasize certain skills and characteristics. Review their resume before they submit any applications, checking for spelling or grammatical mistakes, formatting issues, or any relevant experience they may have forgotten to list.

Practice for the interview

Prospective employers know teens won’t have lots of work experience; because of this, they tend to rely heavily on the interview process when making hiring decisions. Help your child ace their interview by going over practice questions, helping them choose an interview outfit, or reviewing business etiquette. Ask a friend, neighbor, or colleague to come over for the evening to conduct a mock interview; this will help your teen get comfortable speaking to a strange adult.

Design a custom internship

No luck finding a position? Help your teen design their own internship. Brainstorm ideas for an independent study project, such as conducting market research or identifying business trends. Next, find a teacher or other community member to “sponsor” or advise them on the project. Not only does this show initiative and creativity, but it can also help your teen make connections for potential positions next year.